Blurbs

 
Death Destruction and a Packet of Peanuts
 
From the 17th Century...
 The atmosphere had thickened dramatically over the last hour or so and a storm looked to be on the way. It certainly was. At 7.30pm, a massive clap of thunder roared above the open moor. Ferocious rain poured down. Suddenly the entire Allied front line surged across the field...
 
To the 21st Century...
 Pete seemed to be in rewind that day, as if he'd started out drunk, and got more intelligent, switched-on and sober with every beer consumed. My theory was blown apart the moment we stepped from the Lamb's door twenty minutes later. He'd had six pints and so should have, by my reckoning, been bordering on a professorship. Instead he sang 'You Are My Sunshine' to a passing dog and tried to get in the wrong car.
 
 
 
A Cat Called Birmingham
 
Darwin coined his theory of evolution based on survival of the fittest. He'd obviously never met Brum.
In the long history of mankind's relationship with felines, one cat stands head and shoulders below the rest. Highly inflammable, the glass-jawed Birmingham lurches from one catastrophe to the next. Through encounters with washing machine spin cycles to his lovelorn pursuit of the aggressively uninterested Sammy, Chris Pascoe's hilarious book paints an intimate portrait of the author's calamitous relationship with a cat wholly unsuited to being feline.
The Question is, will nine lives be enough?
 
 
 
You Can Take the Cat Out of Slough...
 
Last summer, I decided to do something monumentally stupid. I decided to stay at home with my two-and-a-half year old daughter Maya and accident-prone tabby Birmingham - Brum for short. And also with Brum's rather vicious live-in-partner-girl-cat Sammy, who I intended mainly not to wake. Let biting cats lie. Why I believed time with Brum would, with all the years of contrary evidence, be 'quality' I'm not at all sure.
 
'An original comic voice - wry, self-assured, sometimes whimsical and sometimes surreal but throughout refreshingly uncynical...the best kind of humour'
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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